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, which is the backbone of our economy. earlier, a representative from kentucky talked about how it is the right thing to do to improve the health of thousands of his citizens over the next decade. he also talked about it from an economic and fiscal standpoint. 50 million dollars will be injected into kentucky's economy. it will bring $800 million to the state treasury, create 17,000 jobs and support their glad toso we were very hear what he had to say at the press event and afterward. in few areas has a lot been of greater impact than in the lives americans with chronic conditions. if you had insurance that you liked before, whatever it was, it is going to be better now because of no pre-existing conditions being a barrier to your access to insurance. also removing lifetime or even on the funding you can receive for care. thanks to affordable health care act in relationship to pre- existing conditions, up to 17 million children with pre- existing conditions have already been able to gain affordable coverage. starting january 1, up to 129 million americans, including children, in
objection, the subcommittee is adjourned. president obama on jobs and the economy and income inequality. in less than hour, the head of of mayor confederation teachers speaks with reporters at the christian science monitor. walden,esentative greg on to make haitians and technology. communications and technology. >> a several live events to tell you about tomorrow morning. treasury secretary jack lew will be at the future will trust to discuss the state of financial reform. also on c-span2, members of the house and energy commerce subcommittee on energy and power will hear from energy regulatory commissioners. span330 eastern a.m. on c- we cover a hearing on unemployment benefits that are set to expire at the end of the month. >> from age eight, betty ford, then betty [inaudible] put on skits and plays and that led to eddington, vermont where she studied at the school of dance. these are some of her notecards. no bookstworks -- where she kept cards. she carried this with her to vermont, back to grand rapids, off to new york where she studied with martha graham and work with the powers m
. more than anything else, they want a job. but finding work remains very difficult in an economy that still has one point 5 million fewer jobs than before the recession started six years ago. we have never had anything close to such a sustained job deficit after any recent downturn. it has been said in opposition to an extension that the federal emergency unemployment compensation program was adopted for extraordinary circumstances that are disappearing. no. no. these extraordinary circumstances continue, as indicated in the report issued just this morning by president obama's council of economic advisers. it highlights that the current long-term unemployment rate is at least twice as high as it was at the expiration of every previous extended ui benefit program. the extraordinary circumstances continue. the report also sets out the economic impact of a failure to act. it agrees with cbo and other economists. allowing the federal ui program to expire will cost our economy at least 200,000 jobs next year because of reduced consumer demand. for this congress to ignore the national
confidence to our economy, to the business community and to our people if we got a beginning. deal, but unfortunately that does not seem to be, at least at this point in time, in the discussion. i'm hopeful that the budget committee so i'm hopeful that the budget committee conference will revisit or at least come up with a product that has not been discussed which will accomplish the objective of putting this country on a fiscally sustainible path for the long term, >> coming up, treasury secretary jack lew on implementation of the dodd-frank regulations. and president obama at the white house hanukkah reception. later, the democratic steering expiring hearing on unemployment benefits. span, washington journal looks at the mission and role of the national institutes of health. starting live at 7:30 eastern with director francis collins on the medical research priorities. future projects and the impact of sequestration. at 8:00, allergy and infectious diseases director anthony fauci followed by derek green director of the national human genome research institute gave at 9:00, harold
anything else, they want a job. but finding work remains very difficult in an economy that still has 1.5 million fewer jobs than before the recession started six years ago. still ha million fewer jobs than before the recession started six years ago. we have never had anything close to such a sustained job deficit after any recent downturn. it has been said in opposition to an extension that the federal emergency unemployment compensation program was adopted, and i quote, for extraordinary circumstances that are disappearing. no, no. these extraordinary circumstances continue adds indicated in the report issued just this morning by president obama's council of economic advisors, that highlights that the current long-term unemployment rate is at least twice as high as it was at the expiration of every previous extended ui benefit program. the extraordinary circumstances in a few words continue. the report also sets out the economic impact of a failure to act. it occurs with cbo, wall street analysts and other economists, that allowing the federal ui program to expire who cost our economy
, subsequent roads, transit and water investments helped fuel our economy and tie the nation together. more recently, the failure to address long-term funding has also been bipartisan. the bush administration ignored strong recommendations from their own private sector experts that they impaneled to give advice. although the obama administration did request and employ some modest funding in the recovery act and has proposed an infrastructure bank and talked extensively and i think sincerely about the need for investment, what has been lacking has been a specific concrete proposal from either party to address infrastructure financing in america. while the political maneuvering has secured here in washington, the gap in the highway trust fund has been growing and conditions of our roads, bridges and transit systems have been deteriorating. this puts america at a competitive disadvantage, complicates the movement of goods and people and contributes to congestion and pollution. at the same time, the needs grow, the resources are in significant decline. the gas tax has not been increased since t
sure our economy works for every working american. it's why i ran for president. it was the center of last year's campaign. it drives everything i do in this office. and i know i've raised this issue before, and some will ask why i raise the issue again right now. i do it because the outcome of the debate we're having right now, whether it's health care or the budget or reforming our housing and financial systems. all of these things will have real practical imply cage for every american. and i am convinced that the decisions we make on these issues over the next few years will determine whether or not our children will grow up in america where opportunity is real. now, the premise that we're all created equal is the opening line in the american story. and while we don't promise equal outcomes, we've strived to deliver equal opportunity. the idea that success doesn't depend on being born in to wealth or privilege, it depends on effort and merit. with every chapter we've added to the story, we've worked hard to put those words in to practice. it was lincoln a poor man's son who star
of the many bold ideas we have had over the past decade, new ideas to grow the economy from the middle out, to expand health care to all americans, and to improve our schools. still thatuder behind all of these policies is a simple idea -- expanding opportunity for all americans. we believe that no matter where you come from, we are all better off if we have the opportunity to succeed. it is at the heart of what we do every day. we have learned that expanding the middle class is the best way to grow and grow stronger. but i know that principle is critical. also because it has mattered so much in my own life. a suburb of boston, the child of two immigrants from india. inlived in a house bedford, massachusetts, a middle-class town. when i was five, my parents got divorced and my dad left. my mother was on her own and never held a job before. she faced going back to india are going on welfare to support her two children. , we would've been stigmatized. it was unheard of to get divorced back then. she knew our life opportunities to be limited. she made that tough choice. she states. we stayed.
point for the economy. 203,000 jobs created last month. but as low-wage workers take to the streets it looking more like one america with two economies. i'm christine romans. this is "your money." america on track to create nearby 2.3 million jobs this year. but the quality of those jobs could spark the beginning of a 21st century labor movement. fast food workers protesting in 100 cities across the country this week. they're calling for a living wage, $15 an hour. they are not alone in their call for better pay. >> we know there are airport workers and fast food workers and nurse assistants and retail salespeople who work their tails off and are still living at or barely above poverty. >> the president has called for raising the minimum wage to $9 an hour. he also supports a bill in congress to raise it to $10.10 but fast foods workers say $15 an hour the living wage they need. the question, a living wage, who pies? could raising the minimum wage ultimately hurt the very worker rs it's meant to help? it's all in the eye of the beholder. first, look through the low wage workers eyes
of today's opinion pages of "the wall street journal:." again, your thoughts on the economy, especially in light of these new numbers, with the federal unemployment rate at seven percent. in.ere is how you can call we divided the lines differently. if you are under 30 -- it is discussions about the economy that takeover the papers today, especially in light of these new numbers. here is the editorial page of "the new york times." they have a different take -- we start this morning in jacksonville florida. angel is up. good morning, what do you think about the economy in light of these current numbers? good morning. first of all, thank you so much for taking my call. go ahead, you're on. caller: there is still a selection process that is very difficult for many people. thethe reason is simple, young people are being selected -- the selection very picky.ery, degrees and i can't find a job in jacksonville, florida. some cities are picking up quickly, some aren't. keep are you going to looking for work or have you given up? caller: i will keep looking. fairs, i apply for work every day. i s
]. >> you're causing them to become part of this perpetual unemployed group in our economy. >> maybe you should lend a hand, hmmm? >> with the american worker or against them. >> now we have class envy being stoked by the democratic party. >> oh, my gosh. does that suck. >> we have the most unequal distribution of wealth and income in any major country on earth. >> if you raised the minimum wage too high, you're going to have not more jobs but fewer jobs. >> you sit on a throne of lies. >> but income inequality is ticking up nonstop. >> nobody gives you anything. you earn it. >> we have this big conversation going on in this country right now about income inequality. but none of them have ever experienced it. >>> put some ketchup on that one, will you? good to have you with us tonight, folks. thanks for watching. well, do you remember back in 2000 when bush ran and the conservatives coined this term, compassionate conservatism? wow, was that in a different era. there is no compassion, as far as the republicans are concerned. just listen to what they say, just listen to what they're propo
and keep him in peace. >> the labor department released the november jobs numbers showing the economy added 200- 3000 jobs last month and dropping the unemployment rate year 7.3% to 70%, a five- low. the economy has generated just over 200,000 jobs from august to november, up from 159,000 per month between april and electorate -- and electorate reaction coming from capitol hill. house speaker john beat -- house speaker john boehner release a statement -- today's report includes positive sign that mored discourage calls for emergency government stimulus third and said, what our economy needs is more progrowth solutions that get government out of the way. we will bring you live remarks from kentucky senator rand paul speaking at the detroit economic club at 12:35 eastern right here on c-span feared also life during the 12:00 our on c-span2, discussion on hospital admission policies for medicare patients and how that impacts out-of- pocket expenses at 12:15 eastern. also at 12:15 on c-span3, for presidentialan candidate john huntsman and evan bayh will speak about politics. they are cochairs o
of democracy and a propeller of our economy. most importantly, we must really make sure that we figure out how to enable all kids to have the opportunity to not only dream big, but achieve them. >> thank you. let me ask you one or two and then we will go to kimberly to start. let me ask you about the common core standards. you said, you think that obamacare is bad and the implementation of the common core is far worse. who is to blame and anyone stepping up to fix this? >> i am not a big believer in this. i am a union leader and i could easily say, this one, this one, this one. if we are not rolling up our sleeves and actually engaging, then we are in the same debate over who cares about kids. i care about kids, no, i care about kids. that is a debate we are having. let me just say, this is what i think is happened. we do education policy by precedent. i think the governor and the state she's right about saying, let's figure out a set of standards that are aligned to what kids need to know about the global economy. they move pretty fast about it. we were engaged with them and brought a lot of
of taper. it gives them comfort that the economy is doing well. i think friday's job report and some other items recently, i think investors are getting comfortable if it does happen in december. >> if it does happen, they say the fed is more likely to wait and happen next year. what is the fed going to be looking at at this point? you see a stronger jobs number. it's tough for a hawk to say that the feds have a definitive breakout pattern. >> that's right. our economists are saying the fed is probably interested in trying to begin the taper process. i think january is a better date. i think that will help. if we can see spending, we'll see how that will be a factor. >> you said at the end of november that december is likely to be a pretty strong month for the market. last week was a down week. what do you think the month will bring at this point? >> i think investors will want to finish the year strong. i think they're optimistic about 2014. there's still a bit of performance chasing taking place. then our position data we track, hedge fund and mutual fund data and broader macro fund posi
in education, investments in infrastructure, and trying to figure out an economy that works for all i think is important. take tomorrow, fast food workers. 100 places where the fast food workers are going to be staging strikes. and who are the fast food workers now? it is no longer 18-year-old, 19- year-old, 20-year-old kid trying to get into college, or in college and doing this is a job. when you go to mcdonald's, when you go to walmart, you are seeing people in their 60s and 70s. this is wrong. and so i think there is a sense we will see. so, but, in terms of my belly wake, public education, on december 9 there will be over 60 events, 60 cities, counties, towns, and more coming every day, of parents, community groups, clergy, are union foundations talking about how to do bottom up reform, solution reform, community-based reform that actually helps kids be more successful than schools. so we are seeing this community work and this bottom-up organizing in public education, as well as in economic issues. job issues. >> mr. sellwood. >> you mentioned that we should not have a race to the bot
economy and creating more jobs for the american people. that's where the focus is, not more government programs. >> we have a responsibility as american people, people who have played by the rules and lost their job through no fault of their own. and need these benefits in order to survive. >> nbc's capitol hill correspondent kelly o'donnell joins me. the budget is the critical issue but the debate over extending the unemployment benefits set to threaten all of this and the "washington post" reports there are capitol hill aides who say tlsz little chance of it passing before congress leaves for their break. >> reporter: there's a weariness with so many of these fiscal deadlines we've had. we're talking about unemployment benefits for the longest term unemployed, people who really have had a hard time for a long time and congress is not necessarily in the mood to make this a line in the sand issue. clearly some democrats want to see action on this to extend the benefits and some republicans do not in part, for example, one point of view from rand paul of kentucky, saying that by extendi
's imagine ten million people lose their jobs, we expect to fall off in spending. but the economy is certainly better today than it was in 2009, so -- >> i want to put dollars and cents to this. this is the difference in the cbo projected savings. they're projects $222 billion in a year from medicare and medicaid from this slowing of health care costs. the sequester is $87.9, and the cuts to food stamps is $23.8 billion. >>> i have been on twitter all day about this, they can't find a single positive thing to say about the law. literally it could bring people's health care costs down to zero, they could cure cancer, and conservatives would be shouting from the rooftops that it's a disaster. i think this california thing is hysterical. in part because it's the sort of natural conclusion of the republican panic about this. they vote in mass against the law even though it originated in republican ideas. they vote to try to repeal it unsuccessfully. the website they think will sink it, and then they just throw toilet paper at it. >> and in the absence of a website that wasn't malfunct
had to say. >> shut down everybody government.in but let's go to the state of the union. economy continuing to strengthen. no washington shutdowns. i think the president will people's d the confidence will recover. we need to push congress to do immigration, to do smart things to help the economy. the american people are sitting at home talking about all of the issues which is most important to me. job and my -- my income. and that's what washington needs to focus on. are merican people screaming at us. focus for us what's important to us. plouffe there writes -- paints a bright picture on the in zon for the white house terms of how things could go. how do you see that? >> the president said this is in hands. we can try to turn this around as david said about is health working. are people getting insurance? are insurance companies saying yes? right data.g the and, yeah, there are -- there not in that maybe short of term where the -- where the country starts saying, okay, bumpy start. but it's getting better. the economy is improving. at the same time, you -- you have a series of
to try to take the steps to try to get the economy going on in consistent basis and bring unemployment down. he is going to propose a number of tax cuts or tax preferences as well as spending increases to try to do that and that may exacerbate the short-term but then he pivoted which i think is important to talk about the structural deficit. and that is what threatens the state. it's not the ice that is above the water. it's the ice that is below the water. it's not the debt on the balance sheet, it is what is off the balance sheet that disrupts the future and he talked about three things, he talked about freezing a portion of discretionary spending, less than 20% of the federal budget for three years. three years is better than one book, and you know, frankly it is a modest first step especially since discretionary spending has increased 20% plus over the last two years in the second we talked about supporting the pedro rule the senate might be voting on right now. there's lots of holes big enough to drive a truck through and on the other hand it does provide some come strains that ot
-business owners leave the law will have a negative impact on their business. our challenging economy many small business owners are simply not hiring or are reducing worker hours to avoid the employer mandate. thank you to this outstanding panel of witnesses who have taken time from their busy schedules to be here today. we do look forward to your testimony. i now yield to ranking member velazguez for her opening statement. >> thank you mr. chairman. small businesses are that don of our economy but in the past, higher health care costs and declining coverage have hindered small business owners under employees. this has hampered our nations entrepreneurial prowess and held back small businesses. in fact the chairman mentioned the u.s. chamber of commerce has conducted surveys about small businesses asking them what is the main issue that they are concerned about? they talk about the cost of health insurance, to be able to provide and in fact 62% of small businesses in this country provide no health insurance to their employees, their families or themselves. so if anything, this law will enable s
close friday, they ended what was a pretty big week for the u.s. economy. stocks high, unemployment low, and the economy growing better than anyone expected. zane asher is in new york with what it means and how it all happened. >> reporter: fredricka, it was a big week for the economy. car sales rose, new-home sales roared and the unemployment rate dropped to 7%, the lowest since 2008. and it fell for positive reasons, because people are finding work. earlier this year, the unemployment rate declined because a lot of people got discouraged, gave up looking for work and weren't counted, but the opposite seems to be happening. it's added more jobs since 2005 and the gains are not in low-wage sectors. a lot of hiring in health care, transportation, professional services like accountants and travel agents. wages are also up and americans are working more hours. the list goes on. the report pushed the dow up nearly 200 points friday. wall street is thinking the federal reserve will reduce the stimulus program soon. certainly a sign the economy is ready to stand on its own two feet. but remem
able to improve reforms. instruments tous have a very strong economy and especially, very good social results. the facts are there. the economy is growing almost at an average of 5.0%. we have been creating jobs for 14 months in a row. we had a performance of 40 months, month after month, the unemployment rate was going down. we can say that very proudly colombia has created more jobs than any other country in latin america, including brazil. this is something which i think is very important. the jobs that we have been creating for the first time our formal jobs instead of informal jobs. we have put in place specific and focused public policies and ,aken action to fight poverty extreme poverty. peru,sides through -- which has been the country that has performed better in this are theafter peru we best performer in the whole region in terms of decreasing poverty. and also against extreme poverty we have put in place specific actions and we have been able to take on extreme poverty more than one million -- for more than one million colombians. one of the big problems that we bottlenecks
the transition to a new economy, where the federal reserve is not playing that much of a role, can happen. that's what bernanke told us what could happen. it would be amazing as a swan song if it does happen >>> speaking of the fed, front page of the business sentence, the first sentence of ben apple balm's fed piece. federal reserve officials are in no hurry to retreat. >> we're in a weird moment here. when i looked at the pan aklee of knees, not a lot of bad. not a lot of land mines. >> we had this conversation and promptly went down for a few days. >> true but the difference might be that the news flow is very positive this morning. it is indicative of the year. sisco buys a company, u.s. air. no one is thinking they will do that. here is a stock that's been stuck at 33. >> the other one is stuck, period. >> then, we have gilead and this is like apple with china mobile. this is the moment in time that people think, that's new. they create reasons to buy stocks. i was on the phone with somebody who was very big in p.c.s. this has really accelerated. >> p.c.s? >> yes. that's the reasoning behi
a floundering economy. there is one area that can help break the logjam, not solve all our problems, certainly, but help us significantly along the way. congress should address the critical needs of our nation's infrastructure deficit. roads, bridges, transit systems are all increasingly at risk. we are facing an inadequate state of repair, construction of new facilities are on hold and we are losing ground in meeting our own needs, let alone the challenges of global competition. yet, this challenge is an opportunity for some potential progress. we know what to do to meet this challenge. we can write a new transportation bill that will meet today's needs. it just needs more money. there is a vast coalition that supports additional resources for infrastructure. the so-called special interests that are so often at odds are remarkably aligned when it comes time to recognize and fix this problem. business, labor, professional groups, local government, environmentalists, truckers, bicyclists all agree. the paralysis that surrounds questions of raising taxes does not necessarily need to apply in thi
-world war ii era. to folks in washington seem put the brakes on the economy every six months or so, so they are not helpful with respect to real growth in the economy. i think americans will put more money in education when it is doing better. havenk they are going to bigger pressures. legalf course you have reform. education fornd every child. allowed for the growth education, overseeing kids in% of the districts they would already be attending. that is a solution. >> inc. you, governor. i am a senior adviser to the education foundation. you imply we know what works, at there seems to be consensus that the weakest link seems to be our secondary schools. the president announced a grant program. many people believe we are no longer meeting the needs of people. >> we have a number of initiatives doing that, including allowing high school atdents to take courses college. in one case: locating schools on college campuses, or inviting them to have courses in the school. think we failed most of the kids in the early years. we just a bigger price in the later years. a child not doing well in
't create a pro-growth, pro-middle-class economy. and no less than the new pope has now started speaking out about this. when our country had a burgeoning middle class, it's because we had a shared prosperity. now what we're seeing is the opposite. >> can you tell us roughly how many members you have in detroit and how many have been illinois? >> i could if i -- i'm going to give you a paris-roubaix just. in detroit, we have come in detroit itself we have about three, 4000 members. in michigan we have about 15,000 -- i think about 15,000 members. and in illinois we have said probably somewhere around 40,000 members, maybe 50,000 members. [inaudible] >> 19,000 is the average retirement that somebody gets. and in wisconsin, the average retirement that a public employee gets around the country is about 24, $26,000 to the other thing, think about it, every time a retiree, every time someone spends a dollar of the pension, it creates about $2 change, i think $2.37 in economic output in making the. are we going have a pro-growth, pro-investment, pro-middle-class economy? are we going to keep havin
in our economy. >> joining me today, "washington post" columnist jonathan capehart, former white house press secretary and founding partner off-almost said founding father -- founding father and partner of inside agency robert gibbs, congressional reporter for buzz feed and political reporter and white house correspondent at the "huffington post" sam stein. we talked a lot about the pizza versus the pizza box. after the gop autopsy, the republican conviction they didn't actually need to change the product they were selling, they just needed to change the marketing. it's unbelievable me, the whole 47% thing clearly has not made a dent. nowhere do you see that in a more pronounced fashion than republican talking points on unemployment. >> largely, if you ask most members of the gop, 47% to them wasn't a gaffe, it's a belief. i heard it in debates i had with people all of last year before the tape was uncovered. i do think, look, this is one of those things that the republicans will either learn this the easy way or the hard way. i remember watching these debates about unemployment insura
on the website, go to c-span.org. the u.s. economy added 203,000 jobs last month in the unemployment rate fell to seventh that is the lowest since november of 2008 and exceeds analysts predictions. the department releasing figures earlier today. house speaker john boehner released a number on the jobless number and said in part the report includes positive signs that should discourage the calls for more emergency government stimulus and instead with the economy needs is more progrowth solutions to get the government out of the way. begins when out at the end of the year unless congress oks the extension. yesterday the democratic steering committee held a hearing about the issue and heard from several people who face the loss of unemployment checks. here is a part of that meeting. >> i have worked my entire adult life having had three jobs i whole career. and i've never been on employed until now. as soon as i lost my job, i immediately began my furious search for employment and began navigating the world of online board, job boards and diligently networking. my goal was to place my resume in t
on thin --gins, forcing operators to austin, texas remains one of the strong economies in the country. since the recession we have tightened our belts to manage rising costs and we are still very much feeling the impact, including double-digit health insurance -- double-digit health insurance premium increases. it puts pressure on our teams, allen i vendors, on our pricing -- on our vendors, on our pricing. in addition to the aggregation rules, there are several other sections of a lot of impact restaurant operations and similar small businesses. -- of the law that impacts restaurant operations and similar small businesses. the restaurant and food service industry attract people seeking a flexible work environment, whether they are students between careers or just looking for a second job to makes ends -- to make ends meet. there is a significant movement. given the short term nature of individual employment, the administrative urban of educating and processing the enrollments prove almost as expensive as coverage itself. absorb thiscannot cost and ultimately the cost will be warmed b
from taxpayers to get by. we heard the president speak about the economy. i just want to remind everybody what he had to say. take a look. >> we know there are airport workers and fast food workers and nurse assistants and retail sales people who work their tails off, and are still living at or barely above poverty, and that's why it's well past the time to raise a minimum wage that in real terms right now is below where it was when harry truman was in office. >> so, paul, if we look at certain states, california, new jersey, new york, they've raised minimum wage requirements, but on a national level, how effective are demonstrations like what we'll see today to help elevate the conversation to where it needs to be? >> i've been following involved with wage campaigns for more than 20 years. i've never seen this level of national focus and momentum, and in particular, states are already starting to act and they're pushing for much more significant increases in the minimum wage that bring it much closer to the historic level. the president and congress have called for $10 an hour.
'll be right back. as your life changes, fidelity is there for your personal economy, helping you readjust along the way, refocus as careers change and kids head off to college, and revisit your investments as retirement gets closer. wherever you are today, fidelity's guidance can help you fine-tune your personal economy. start today with a free one-on-one review of your retirement plan. where their electricity comes from. they flip the switch-- and the light comes on. it's our job to make sure that it does. using natural gas this power plant can produce enough energy for about 600,000 homes. generating electricity that's cleaner and reliable, with fewer emissions-- it matters. ♪ >>> okay. live look at capitol hill as the sun has yet to come up. here with us director of the earth institute, economist jeffrey sachs. we have sacks and rattner. >> heck of a "new york times" article, obviously the sort of things you've been talking about for so long. >> everyone is talking about them now. you know, we went for so long without discussing these realities now. everyone is opening their eyes. an
to ask ms. walker on another issue as far as the trend of basically a part-time economy. the new hires, according to the department of labor. i didn't know they were that bad. in this economy, four out of five new jobs, was that the figure you had, created are part time? >> for every one full-time job that's created, there's four part-time jobs created. >> okay. so when you average the hours, that's not quite four to one. four out of five new jobs. >> and the thing that -- well, that's surprising in and of itself to me. but the trend. and i'm not sure whether it was 2010 to 2012 or what with the years were, but the trend, it's flipped. used to be six full times to one part time versus one to four. >> that is really a devastating figure. it's not devastating for us in this room. it's the folks out there looking for a job, particularly young people, which have been the most devastated in this lack of long-term economic recovery. can you describe a little more what happens and basically this part-time economy, you know, where you're trying to work around, trying to avoid these mandates. p
the economy. american people are talking about all these issues except what is important to me, my job and income. that is what washington needs to focus on. american people are screaming, focus on what is important to us. >> they paint a bright picture on the horizon for the white house in terms of how things could go. how do you see that? >> we can try to turn this around, is working, are people getting insurance, are people saying yes? there are scenarios where the country starts saying, ok, it was a bumpy start but it will get better. the economy is improving. at the same time, you have a series of fiscal debates coming up between the president and congress and those have not gone well. the president and his team see those as opportunities again to sharpen the difference between what he is trying to do for the country and what republicans and their words are impeding. that may be an opportunity for obama to retain some approval ratings, perception of competence among the public there it it is a rosy scenario and there is a lot between now and then that has to get fixed. the white h
to unfold? >> the uncertainty is the plague on the economy. the fact businesses cannot plan health care or tax policy, i don't know their obligations, standing in the way of the progress of recovery by thwarting business at every turn. the economy may be turning around. it is not going to be where it should be, they refused to take the lead and help businesses. they are together, it is a shared responsibility and went businesses do their job and congress is not doing theirs, they had to start reading up on capitol hill with the hous housd senate and the protected. adam: oil is holding steady in today's trade, so the prices come too far, too fast? let's turn to phil flynn in the trading pits of the cme. explain, what happened. >> i don't know if it is so much wti came up too much, too fast, or the fact everybody was unwinding. the main feature was to buy brand, that with the trade going to the end of the year. now with supplies the u.s. at the highest level since the 1930s, production coming on and reversal of the keystone pipeline from pushing down is going to bring the spread back in.
of shared investment in education, investments in infrastructure, and trying to figure out an economy that works for all i think is important. take tomorrow, fast food workers. 100 places where fast food workers are going to be staging strikes. and who are the fast food workers now? is no longer 18-, 19-, 20- year-old kid trying to get into college, or in college and doing this is a job. when you go to mcdonald's, when you go to walmart, you are seeing people in their 60s and 70s. this is wrong. and so i think there is a sense -- we will see. so, but, in terms of my belly wake, public education, on december 9 there will be over 60 events, 60 cities, counties, towns, and more coming every day, of parents, community groups, clergy, are union how toions talking about do bottom up reform, solution reform, community-based reform that actually helps kids be more successful than schools. so we are seeing this community work and this bottom-up organizing in public education, as well as in economic issues. job issues. >> mr. sellwood. >> you mentioned that we should not have a race to the bott
economic growth and growing the economy and giving everyone a chance to go ahead. people don't want redistribution. but with the republican party offering very little his message resonates with the democratic base. >> if you don't think we should raise the minimum wage, let's hear your idea to increase people's earnings. you don't think of child should have access to preschool, tell us what you would do differently to give them a better shot. martha: increase the inmum wage and increase childhood education. >> he spoke as if he hadn't been president. he spoke as if he's on the outside of his own presidency. he has been president for five years. what we have seen in the speech and what we'll continue to see is more class warfare because this is who he is. he is a leftist and essentially a socialist. so he believes in waging the class warfare. when he talks about -- when he spoke about the american dream he has a warped leftist view of that dream. he believes the state should use its to force greater income he:quality. when government do that it's essentially called communism. the ame
coming over here and competing in the gobble economy. education is at the core of this and goes to connecting that bond that has been broken. >> you have all this evidence that's truly offensive. take the detroit pension ruling. so we know what the ruling was and we know what the effect may be on people's pensions. they will be cut. city employees, firefighters, no matter how the pension deal was cut years ago the pensions will be cut. but before the pensioners receive their pension who gets paid first? the bond holders, the banks, the big boys and then, then the pensioners will get paid. there's something just deeply flawed with what's been going on in this country and it's not one party or the other, it's the whole system and it's a couple of decades that it's been going on. >> there's a suspicion the people who have been having these massive hikes in their compensation packages are not reinvesting necessarily in job growth and productivity. they are actually -- it feels to a lot of americans on main street like funny money, it's getting recycled, reput into investment funds t
for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: the president sought to shift the focus today, away from what's gone wrong with implementing the health care law to what's gone right. he said the benefits are being overlooked amid problems with the web site and policy cancellations. but insurers still warn they're getting unusable data. we'll have a full report on the president's new p.r. push right after the news summary. >> the university of notre dame over the healthcare law's mandate to cover birth control for students and employees. school officials went to court today arguing they are being forced to violate roman catholic teachings, a federal judge
. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 70% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. >>> president obama will be joining me on the "hardball" college tour tomorrow. and if you have any questions for him, just go to the "hardball" page on msnbc.com. smi submit your proposed question on the comment section. and we'll be right back. every day we're working to be an even better company - and to keep our commitments. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in the world. in fact, we've invested over $55 billion here in the last five years - making bp america's largest energy investor. our commitment has never been stronger. >>> if you still don't like obama care, and i know you don't, even though it's based on m
. ♪ (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. and our networks are getting crowded. but if congress, the fcc, and the administration free up... more licensed wireless spectrum, we can empower more... people to innovate, create new technologies and jobs... and strengthen the economy. america is the world's leader in wireless. let's keep it that way. free up licensed spectrum today, so wireless... can do more for america tomorrow. so when my moderate to severe chronic plaque psoriasis them. was also on display, i'd had it. i finally had a serious talk with my dermatologist. this time, he prescribed humira-adalimumab. humira helps to clear the surface of my skin by actually working inside my body. in clinical trials, most adults with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis saw 75% skin clearance. and the majority of people were clear or almost clear in just 4 months. humira can lower your ability to fight infections, including tuberculosis. serious, sometimes fatal events, such as infections, lymphoma, or other types of c
after this. ♪ (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. >>> people all over the world are remembering nelson mandela. don lemon is in harlem at the apollo theater. a very special place, tell us why. >> reporter: absolutely. he visited here in 1990 after he got out of prison. you can see the marquis. it says nelson mandela, 1918-2013. he changed our world. i'm standing here next to this gentleman for a reason. he is the in-house cultural director and tour guide for the apollo. you were here when nelson mandela visited in 1990. what was that like? >> i was so blessed to be a part of the hundreds of thousands of people that were here to welcome nelson mandela to harlem. it was a very emotional time for me. a very spiritual -- it felt like a spiritual time. >> he felt a connection here. i live in the neighborhood. there are many africans, a place they call little africa not far from here. >> on 116th street between madison, they have little african shops, african restaurants, african culture. litz africa. >> and h
a healthy economy. but we also want a healthy quality of life for citizenry. epa staffers have played a critical role in achieving these goals since its inception. as members of congress, i think we should strive to educate eric h. units, not scare them. i hope today i can resist the temptation to try for provocative soundbites from my district and instead use today's hearing to better understand what epa has been tasked to accomplish, howard is doing on those tasks and how we in congress can help it do it's job market really. administrator mccarthy, i know you have a very tough job and i want to commend you for your willingness to take it on its side of all the hurdles to you in your agency face. i look forward to your testimony and i look forward to working with you to help epa achieve the goals that the nation has asked us to carry out. i thank you you know that my time. >> thank you, ms. johnson. members can submit them for the record and they will appear at this point. or witness today's the honorable gina mccarthy, administrator of the environmental protection agency. prior to h
a time when this wasn't a big problem and we were in an economy where you could make it into the middle class. and some educators say that the passport to middle class used to be the high school diploma. but not anymore. there is a new economy and a new passport to middle class is education beyond high school. and girls seem to be getting at amboise lesson lasts. so i feel that that problem -- i cannot find major organizations or government groups and the department of education is still talking about the shortchange of this because they were deeply influenced by the early research that said the girls weren't shortchanged. so they haven't adjusted to the times. we have the white house counsel, women and girls, concerned about the education of girls so girls don't fall behind. and when it's boys, it's like they are significantly behind girls. so i think we need this as well. >> host: you write that women in the u.s. now earn 62% of the associate degrees and 57% of bachelors degrees and 60% of masters degrees and 52% of doctorates, college admissions officers, they were first baffled and
side as well, came out and said that is what happens, standard and poor's says the cost economy is $1 million, they just make those numbers up. is not true. wait a minute, standard and poor's is a different agency, they are moving out, that lenders out there and that does have an effect and you take the ordinary citizen and they're trying to decide what is in the best interest of their family or with you want to go in their country and having a hard time making decisions because we have a woman who works in montana, a wonderful friend who does a great job, three times week she comes across a bridge in the river quite wide eyed, you won't believe what i read on the internet. i always say the same thing. i am not going to believe what you read on the internet. >> we talked before hand, we fought to give you a sense of a very personal nature, what comes through in these letters is arthur was not only a preeminent historian, he would have two martinis and go back and write 5,000 words. what comes through with their he is having a dustup with nathaniel buckley or somebody else is the enorm
'm visiting you here in washington, but the folks in washington seem to put the brakes on the economy every six months or so, right? or even more often than that. so, you know, they're not helping. and with respect to real growth in the economy. i think that americans will put more money into education when the economy is doing better or when they confront the fact that defunding education is actually hurting them and their state. and so i think there's kind of a bigger picture and bigger pressures out there that are going to play on this. and then, of course, you also have legal requirements within -- and constitutional requirements within states. we're certainly one of those states that under our constitution we guarantee an education to every child. there have been tests, we have a very famous test in connecticut, shep v. o'neill, to kneel being former governor that -- to o'neill being former governor that allowed for a super education district overseeing about 41% of the kids in the greater hartford school district and surrounding districts, putting them in different schools than they w
issue from the bucket, economy, jobs, health care, immigration you name it they will stand in the way of quote giving him a win. they don't want him to succeed. as we know, there have been two books wren that republicans collude before he was inaugurated to insure he would not be successful. so a president's job is to be hopeful and optimistic. that's what the president is being here, but that's not to say that he shouldn't try. because the president, while hopeful and optimistic. he's dealing with all these obstruction and impediments, he has to try, otherwise why be in the job? >> what's the point of the job. isaac, when you watched the interview, it was sort of interesting to watch a president expound at length about what it's like to be president while he's president. it is sort of an interesting experience we don't get to see. what were you seeing? what were you taking away from what you heard the president talking about this week? >> this was the first interview obama has done in a few weeks where he seemed back on hills game, he seemed confident, feisty. happy, the last few tim
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